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Adapting Documents for the Classroom: Equity and Access
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Spotlight on Elementary Education

In this Lesson Plan Review, students analyze primary and secondary sources describing an encounter between the Lewis and Clark expedition and a Native American tribe. The lesson overall is a great way to encourage students to work collaboratively to analyze this important historical interaction from multiple perspectives.

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Lesson Plan Reviews

Evaluate key elements of effective teaching Watch the INTRODUCTORY VIDEO
Lewis and Clark: Same Place, Different Perspectives

How geography influenced interactions among Lewis, Clark, & Native [...] »

Transportation: Past, Present and Future

What pushes and pulls people into new ways of life? In this lesson, students [...] »

English Language Learners

Instructional strategies and resources for ELL
America's Heritage: An Adventure in Liberty
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Supporting Text Comprehension and Vocabulary Development Using WordSift
screen shot-wordshift home page

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Teaching Guides

Explore new teaching methods and approaches
Well-behaved Women [and Men] Seldom Make History

Help your elementary school students get more out of historical biographies [...] »

Applying KWL Guides to Sources with Elementary Students

To engage with a source, ask, "What do I know, what do I want [...] »

Using Blogs in a History Classroom

Setting up and maintaining a blog for your classroom is easy (and typically [...] »

Adapting Documents for the Classroom: Equity and Access

Documents are riddled with difficult vocabulary. Don't be afraid to adapt [...] »

Historical Agency in History Book Sets (HBS)

Looking for ways to use fiction in your elementary history curriculum? Read [...] »

Ask a Master Teacher

History is All Around Us
Photo, "The Browning school. . . ," March 1915, Lewis Wickes Hine, LoC

Looking for history right where you are. You'd be surprised how inspiring [...] »